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Tuesday, March 28, 2017
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  EAGLE Network Reports
BACKGROUND

The mission of the EAGLE network is to establish effective wildlife law enforcement, spreading an innovative NGO-Government model demonstrating the need and posibility of a paradigm shift in the fight against wildlife crime. The model shifts focus from small poachers to the big traffickers activating them and use the fight against corruption, complicity and impunity to get the law applied.The network started with a baseline of zero prosecution under the wildlife law in almost all countries of West and Central Africa. Today, with more than 900 traffickers put behind bars, the EAGLE Network is leading the fight against wildlife crime with more than 1,000 major wildlife traffickers jailed to date, fighting corruption to break complicity and ensure justice.

The model of EAGLE has started in Cameroon and is now replicated in eight countries that form a network, and shifted countries from zero wildlife prosecutions to a rate of one major trafficker arrested prosecuted and imprisoned per week.


The Crisis

The most immediate critical threat for African elephants, rhinos, apes and other endangered wildlife is large-scale poaching and the organized networks and trafficking that generate it.  Although national laws and international treaties throughout their range protect threatened species, the enforcement of these laws has historically been very weak if existing at all and has provided little or no deterrent value. In fact, the problem of weak law enforcement and judiciary ineffectiveness is one of the most serious underlying causes perpetuating the increase in poaching in particular and wildlife crime in general. The main reason for the lack of enforcement and application of the wildlife law throughout Africa is the widespread corruption.

 

Consequently the illicit trade and the associated wildlife massacres are commonplace.  Illegal wildlife trade currently amounts to $7-10 billion per year and ranks fifth globally in terms of value after drugs, people, oil and counterfeiting. A recent study showed that around 100,000 elephants were killed for their tusks between 2010 and 2012 across Africa. Great apes remain threatened by the illegal trade. The western black rhino is already extinct in Central Africa, as is the northern white rhino – a reminder of the urgency. The EAGLE Network began in Central Africa, yet quickly spread into West Africa. Almost 2/3 of Central Africa’s elephants are believed to have been lost due to the illegal ivory trade and elephants from the sub-region are trafficked out in large numbers via West Africa as well as East Africa, and often on to Asia. The wildlife traffickers at all of these levels are well organized in international criminal syndicates that often participate in other illegal activities, including narcotics and weapons, sometimes with links to terrorist networks. While international media focuses on poachers, traffickers still live largely in impunity across the globe and continue to operate in this low-risk environment.


EAGLE (Eco Activists for Governance and Law Enforcement) aims to protect elephants, apes, rhinos and other threatened wildlife species in key African countries from this large-scale poaching, by increasing the level of wildlife law enforcement in each country and deterring would-be poachers and traffickers from conducting these activities.



  Reports

SUMMARY

13 significant wildlife traffickers were arrested during operations held in 4 countries this month. This is as low as about a half of the monthly average of the Net­
work for the past few months. Investigations efforts are intensified across the Network in order to impro­ ve output for the next months. Ape trafficking investigation led to an arrest of 2 traf­fickers of a baby chimp in Guinea. Both of them were prosecuted within the same month and were senten­ced to one year and 6 months in prison. 6 traffickers were arrested in Cameroon in 3 operations, two of them were trying to sell 4 gorilla skulls. 4 traffickers were arrested two weeks later in 2 back­to­back ope­rations with 10 sea turtle shells. In Gabon 2 ivory traf­fickers were arrested with 2 elephant tusks, weigh­ ting 16 kg. Successful arrest was carried in Benin, where 2 traf fickers were caught with 150 pythons and pangolin scales. The Royal Pythons, fully protec­ted species, will be released back to the wild. Total of 18 traffickers were prosecuted within the Net­work and were given varying imprisonment senten­ces.
The EAGLE Network launched its new website – www.EAGLE-enforcement.org








MONTHLY ACTIVITY REPORT


APRIL EAGLE NETWORK REPORT 2015

MARCH EAGLE NETWORK REPORT 2015


FEBRUARY EAGLE NETWORK REPORT 2015


JANUARY EAGLE NETWORK REPORT 2015

DECEMBER EAGLE NETWORK REPORT 2014

NOVEMBER EAGLE NETWORK REPORT 2014


OCTOBER EAGLE NETWORK REPORT 2014

































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Countries covered by EAGLE initiative:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  




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